Rush News

Rush Rediscovered LP Box Set Now Available - Unboxed by Kim Mitchell

UPDATE: Yesterday on his radio show Kim Mitchell unboxed the ReDISCovered boxed set.  You can see it here- Thanks to Gavin Oliver for the headsup!

Today Rush reDISCovered, the Universal Music Enterprises (UMe) reissue of the debut album RUSH on vinyl to mark Rush's 40-year recording career, part of Universal's reDISCovered vinyl series, is now available. If you haven't already you can order your copy here.

Following the April 29th release of Rush reDISCovered, Rush's debut re-entered the Billboard Top 200 chart at #127.
In March of 1974, Rush released their self-titled debut through the band's own indie label, Moon Records in Canada, and quickly sold out of the initial 3500 copies originally pressed. Moon Records would soon become Anthem Records, which launched in 1977, and continues to serve as the band's only Canadian record company.

To mark the band's 40-year recording career Universal Music Enterprises (UMe) will celebrate with the vinyl reissue of the original Moon Records (pre-Mercury) release of Rush, as part of Universal's reDISCovered vinyl series. Housed in a sturdy, custom box with a lift-off top, this landmark album is pressed on 200g, audiophile grade vinyl, from the original 1974 analog stereo masters, cut to copper plates using the Direct Metal Mastering (DMM) process at the legendary Abbey Road Studios. Rush also features the original Moon Records jacket art, complete with the original MN-100-A/B Matrix etching, and will include a 16"x22" reproduction of the first Rush promo poster, three 5"x7" lithographs of Geddy Lee, Alex Lifeson and John Rutsey, a 12"x12" Rush Family Tree poster, and a digital download card for a free digital copy of this newly remastered release.

Featuring the band's original line up, Lee, Lifeson and Rutsey, Rush's eponymous 1974 debut features eight hard-hitting rockers including "Finding My Way," the fast-paced "Need Some Love," "Take A Friend," "What You're Doing," the southern rock vibe of "In The Mood," and their U.S. breakthrough anthem "Working Man" which was made famous by Cleveland, Ohio's WMMS radio station. Other tracks include the more melodic "Here Again" and the atmospheric "Before and After," which gradually builds into a burst of power chords and heavy guitar riffs.


"There are so many memories associated with the re-release of our very first album that one hardly knows where to begin. Like most first albums, it is sort of a miracle that it came into being at all. We originally recorded most of the songs in a studio in downtown Toronto, between the hours of 2 a.m. until 8 a.m. AFTER we had finished playing 5 sets a night at a local rock club. You can imagine the logistics of that.. good thing that we were so.. er... resilient!

We managed to record an album's worth of material in a matter of days and the engineer who worked with us then mixed the entire record in one evening. After the club date ended we came in to hear the final mix and we were crushed with disappointment, it sounded so ..well... polite .... nothing at all like the way we sounded live and not at all what we wanted. He simply did not understand us. So the next day we ran to our manager for help and we were directed to an ex-pat British engineer and producer named Terry Brown.

We met with Terry and instantly felt we were on better footing. After he had come to hear us play live, he suggested that we come to his studio, Toronto Sound, and re-record many of the overdubs and record a few of the "newer" songs that we had written and then re-mix the rest. It wasn't perfect but it sounded sooo much better and more importantly it sounded like us! Terry saved the album.. no question about that! It began a very happy collaboration between us that endured until 1981 after we had completed the Signals album." - Geddy Lee on the making of Rush self-titled debut album

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