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a tribute to rush

A Tribute To Rush


The progressive rock trio RUSH released their first album in 1974. Shortly thereafter, Alex Lifeson (guitars) and Geddy Lee (bass, vocals and keyboards) were joined by Neil Peart (percussion, lyricist). After over 40 years together the band has released a total of 20 studio albums, 11 live albums as well as numerous compilation albums, of which 24 have gone gold, and 14 platinum.

Here you will find current news, a complete discography with lyrics, a videography, listings of RUSH members' solo projects and guest appearances, as well as the most extensive RUSH tour archive to be found online or in print. Other resources include a wide-ranging listing of RUSH related literature, cover songs and albums, tributes, a pop culture section and more. Along with the information archive, this site includes a slew of RUSH offerings including album art wallpaper for your PC and Smartphone, and Windows users can utilize Themes inspired by the album art and music of RUSH.


Rush News

Alex Lifeson comments on "For What It's Worth" - Rollingstone

Rollingstone posted a new feature regarding the 50th anniversary of the event which led to Stephen Stills writing Buffalo Springfield's "For What It's Worth".  The song was released as a single on January 9, 1967, and later included on the second pressing of Buffalo Springfield (originally released on December 5, 1966, second pressing released on March 6, 1967).  Rush covered the song on their Feedback EP, and in the article, Alex Lifeson shares his memories of the song.
Rush's Alex Lifeson recalls first hearing the song while driving in the family car in the Toronto suburbs. "I'm not sure if it was the first time I heard it, but I clearly remember driving with my dad and wearing blue granny glasses, which I thought were so cool," Lifeson says. "It was a sunny day, and I put the radio on and 'For What It's Worth' came on. I still recall feeling so moved by that song. It sounded so cool to me, that combination of the acoustic and electric guitars and the lyrics. Canada was a haven for objectors to the war, so we had a different view on what was happening in Vietnam."

During its early days, Rush used to jam on the song – "a 10-minute arrangement with a seven-minute guitar solo and a bass solo and then back into the chorus," Lifeson chuckles – and later recorded it on their 2004 covers set, Feedback. "I suggested it and it was an important song for all of us," he says. "Even when I hear that song now, I get goosebumps. I always think of the ride with my dad. It's one of those really special, magical songs. It may be my favorite song of all time."
- Thanks to RushFanForever for the headsup!

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